In retrospect…

August 28, 2014 | Posted in 2014, Indonesia, Summer Projects, U Idaho | By

Hello virtual world! It has been a while. Upon return from Bali, half of the team launched right into the summer institute and the other half fell back into normal life in our respective home towns.

This week we are all reunited and are jumping back on the Nourish train. Having the group back together has given us a lot of opportunity to look back upon our time in Bali.

We started off the journey pale but bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. We returned home after an amazing stint in Bali a little road-weary but tanner and satisfied. We were able to teach students of varying ages English skills like reading, writing, speaking and listening. With education, the progress is difficult to see to the naked eye but everyone was able to find worth in students correctly utilizing a pronoun or remembering to differentiate between he and she (there is no gender in Indonesian.)

The last week of our stay was all about launching an environmental program. We talked about this a bit in the previous blog post so I won’t bore you with all of the details again but we were able to make a real and visible impact on the coastline by Slukat and seemingly inspire many students to take initiative in their own communities and make a change for a more environmentally-friendly Indonesia.

As well as working with the students, the Slukat alumni were often around the compound and always willing to sit and chat. They also sought help with academia and English. For example, Agus is a talented young man who is looking to study abroad in Japan to further his hopeful law career in Bali. However, money and a solid application were needed for this so there was editing to be done as well as networking for finances. Check out his Gofundme page if y’all are interested in learning more. http://www.gofundme.com/c3cimk

I think that every team member had interactions with people this summer: students, staff, alumni, local people or other travelers that really widened their perspective on human nature. We were treated with nothing but kindness and respect by almost every single person we encountered. Sure, I would like to think that we made an impact and bettered the lives of our students; but they definitely made a bigger impact on our lives. And we are incredibly lucky to have been given such an amazing opportunity.

Thank you so very very much to everyone who contributed time or thoughts or money to our journey. We could not have done it without you and we appreciate it so much!

IDAHO OUT!

Nourish University of Idaho Chapter

Brick by Brick

August 26, 2014 | Posted in 2014, U Washington, Uganda, Uncategorized | By

As we head into our last week in Uganda, things are starting to wrap up. It’s exciting to see all of the projects that we’ve been working on so close to completion, but it’s sad to think that we only have a few more days to spend with the wonderful people we’ve grown to know over the past month.

The wells are nearly complete, both just waiting for pumps. Thanks to the unpredictability of Ugandan electricity, there are still a few parts that weren’t ready to pick up over the weekend, so we are waiting for them to arrive from Kampala in the next few days. Installing the water pump and purification system is the last step before both Kiseeza and Mazooba have fully functioning wells and clean water!

DSC_1318 (Tarryn and Sarah helping lay bricks and rocks in Mazooba)

One  inspiring moment from the past week was watching the community come together in Mazooba during construction. The well is at the bottom of the hill where trucks cannot reach, so we had to dump all of the bricks and rocks at the top. We spent one full day with community members helping shift the materials to the bottom, working alongside people of all ages carrying what they could manage, whether that was one brick, or eight.

DSC_1249 (Children from Mazooba carrying rocks down the hill)

We also had the chance this week to sit down with Walusimbi Willy, one of the co-founders of Rural Health Care Foundation, to talk with him about all of the different projects the organization does. We realized that we didn’t know about much outside of our projects since we’d been so focused on water. After hearing everything, we were blown away by the range of projects and extensive  involvement they have with the communities surrounding Mubende. RHCF started with a goal of improving the health of communities, initially leading to programs in HIV/AIDS treatment. As the organization grew, they added on projects for orphans, food and nutrition, maternal health, and other small projects. While water is their primary focus now, RHCF still runs projects in all of these other areas when funding is available.

While we have all been working very hard on completing the wells, we did steal a weekend to get away. Nearly all of the RHCF staff went with us to Queen Elizabeth National Park to go on a safari! It was really fun to hang out with the staff outside of work and get to experience something new for all of us. We saw lots of different animals, from water buck to elephants to hippos lounging in the Kazinga Channel. We also got to cross the equator!

 

IMG_2744 (Us at the equator with Willy, Doctor, Roland, and Pius).

 

 

Nourish International Launches New Look!

August 20, 2014 | Posted in 2014, Nourish Office, Office Updates | By

Nourish Community,

We are pleased to roll out our new logo and tagline this month. Nourish International’s new look can be attributed to a partnership with Clean Design, a brand and ad agency based in Raleigh, NC that was recently named the #1 Graphic Design Firm in the Triangle. All of their services were generously donated to support the re-brand.

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Our new logo, featured in our August 2014 Newsletter, captures the three elements and synergy of our work to engage students, empower communities, and use business as a tool to impact poverty. In addition, the vibrant colors capture the global reach of our work and innovative spirit of the Nourish Network. Our new tagline, “Impacting Poverty with Ingenuity,” showcases our entrepreneurial spirit and unique model in our field of work.

We are delighted to share our new look with you and hope you will join us in showing our appreciation for Clean Design for their tremendous support in this process.

Kelly's Signature

Kelly Leonhardt Phoenix
Executive Director
Nourish International

P.S. Interested in representing the new Nourish look? Purchase one of our Nourish T-Shirts today! Shirts are just $15. Deadline to order is tomorrow (8/21) at 10PM. Buy one today!

Nourish Students Will Join the Millennium Campus Conference 2014– Not Too Late to Apply!

August 19, 2014 | Posted in 2014, Nourish Office | By

We are honored to announce that six Nourish students will be joining Nourish International staff at the Millennium Campus Conference in Boca Raton in October. Nourish has been named a co-host for this year’s Millennium Campus Conference, and we are thrilled to have Nourish students join us at this transformative conference!

The six Nourish students selected to join us are:

Abigail Mackey, Ohio State University

Anna Zigmond, Indiana University

Annie Finley, University of Idaho

Hailey Lewis, University of Idaho

Dineka Ringling, University of Idaho

Reynel Mirabal, Barry University

MCC will be held on Lynn University’s campus from Oct. 10-12. The conference aims to gather college students from all over the world to voice youth perspectives on the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. During the conference, students will participate in workshops and listen to world renowned speakers such as New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, Peace Corps Director Carrie Hassler-Radelet, and President of the US Fund for UNICEF Caryl M. Stern.

Nourish students can still apply to attend the conference: Apply Here to be part of the Nourish delegation representing Nourish at MCC (Note: scholarship opportunities are now closed).  Students will also need to complete a separate application directly with MCC at http://www.mcc2014.org/apply/. The registration fee is $65. The Late Application Deadline to apply is September 5.


Don’t miss out on this incredible opportunity!

Update from UW Project Interns in Uganda

August 14, 2014 | Posted in 2014, Summer Projects, U Washington, Uganda, Uncategorized | By

It’s almost half way through our project and things are going well! Both of the water projects are underway. The first, in Kiseeza, should be working by the middle of next week. We helped to build the cement covering a few days ago and we’re waiting for it to dry before we can finish up. Yesterday, we watched the start of the second water project in Mazooba village – in one day the community dug 10 feet! It’s been really exciting to witness the construction of both projects and to see the commitment of the community.

These successes haven’t come without some slight setbacks. The weather, periodic heavy downpours, have definitely delayed the progress at Kiseeza. Many times, due to soil saturation, the sides of the well caved in. This destroyed the work on the day and the well had to be re-dug. The heavy rains also have been affecting our ability to get to and from the site. Our car has been stuck in the mud more than once, but thanks to the ingenuity of the villagers, we have been able to get it out and moving again. This definitely isn’t what we expected when we thought about complications, but thankfully nothing has been able to stop us from pushing forward!

In our free time, we’ve taken on a few more projects at the office to help make an even bigger impact. Tarryn has been working on helping create reports and graphs from baseline data, and teaching the staff how to use the various programs needed. We’ve also been helping to revamp their website to make it more user friendly and to hopefully help them attract more donors and grants! Check it out!

On our way back from Kampala last weekend, we had the honor to stop by another RHCF project – Rural Mama Children’s Home. We found out that it is an orphanage that was created as an offshoot of an HIV/AIDS program that they were running in order to find care for the orphans of the affected persons. While it is still largely under construction, the work that RHCF has done and what they hope to do is inspiring, and we can’t wait to see where it goes.

Probably the hardest experience we’ve had so far is visiting the only school in Kiseeza that services all children in a 6km radius. Being only 2 years old, it serves over 150 students from baby school (preschool) to primary four. Despite being on holiday, most students showed up to greet us and sing us songs. The headmaster and one of the teachers took us on a tour of the grounds and told us about how important education was to the village and the children. Unfortunately, even though there is a need and desire for education, only 100 kids were able to take their exams due to the high cost of school fees. When we asked how much it was, we were devastated to hear that one trimester only cost 15,000 shillings, the USD equivalent of $6. Needless to say, we were inspired to do something to help the children and the school grow, and hopefully we will be able to contribute in the future (keep an eye out, we’re working on a plan!!)

 

Here are some photos so you can see what we’ve been up to!

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This is a kid getting water from the current water source. Not only are these local sources highly contaminated and shared with livestock, they also pose a danger to children who can fall in and drown.

DSC_0885

Measuring how deep the well at Kiseeza is. You can see the flooding around the well that happened after a rainstorm.

 

Celebrating our largest Summer Institute to date!

August 13, 2014 | Posted in 2014, Nourish Office, Summer Institute | By

Thanks to our generous supporters, passionate students, alumni and speakers, the 2014 Summer Institute was our largest to date. The rigorous and rewarding 5-day conference prepared students for the challenges they’ll face as Chapter members this year. Through workshops, mentoring and hands-on training, students learned how to earn money, partner with international communities, and run a successful Nourish Chapter on their campuses.

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With each day focusing on a different aspect of what it takes to succeed in international development, students are now prepared to hit the ground running as they start a new and exciting year of Nourish. Here is a glimpse of what was covered at this year’s Institute:

Thursday, July 31- Leveraging Your Passion

It is no secret that it takes passion and dedication to complete a successful international development project. The first day of the conference focused on how to leverage that passion as a tool to create lasting change. Nourish consultant Sarah Miller Frazer discussed how to balance audacity with humility — how to be bold and passionate while understanding that there will be difficulties to overcome along the way. Sam Vaghar, Executive Director and co-founder of The Millennium Campus Network, emphasized the power young people have to change the world now.

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Friday, August 1 – Leveraging Your Chapter

The second day of the conference was all about establishing and marketing Chapters. Ed Cheely, Senior Director of Sales and Business Development at Citrix ShareFile, discussed the importance of company culture and how to apply it to motivate a Nourish team. Nancy Woody from CleanDesign, the brand and design agency that created Nourish’s new logo and look, taught students how to establish their Chapter’s brand. Motivating speakers like Zach Ward from DSI, Allie Ahearn from the UNC Admission’s Office, Alexis Tavarez from the UF Chapter and Frank Phoenix from the Fenwick Foundation shared how to effectively leverage Chapters in the media and in the world.

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Saturday, August 2 – Leveraging Business as a Tool for Good

The values of the business world and the nonprofit world may appear to clash at first glance. However, business skills are vitally important and can be leveraged as a tool for social good. Carlyle Singer, Chief Operating Officer of the Acumen Fund, led a session called “More Money = More Impact” that emphasized the value of business in international development. Adam Wyrick of Citrix ShareFile shared sales techniques and how to apply them to Ventures. Barbara Jessie-Black, Executive Director of the PTA Thrift Shop, discussed how to scale ventures to fit the needs of a community. Students brainstormed and pitched business models that embodied the values of the triple bottom line ­— benefitting people, profit and planet. These models will serve as the foundation for successful Ventures in the coming year.

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Sunday, August 3 – Leveraging Partnership

The Nourish approach is unique in that it relies on building strong relationships with community partners. By working alongside community leaders, student interns gain insight into how best to implement a sustainable project. Nourish Board of Directors member LaHoma Romocki, a former PeaceCorps Cameroon Director, taught the Nourish approach and the successes and challenges of sustainable development. Hillary Larman of the US Fund for UNICEF discussed advocacy in action and how to create successful partnerships. Board members Evan Ashkin and Ann-Marie Clayton explained what partnership means and how to evaluate impact.

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Monday, August 4 – Leveraging What You’ve Learned

The last day of the Institute was bittersweet as students reflected on what they learned throughout the conference. Nourish Board Chairperson Dee Blake talked with students about Nourish’s strategic plan and how to carry it over to their Chapters.

The Nourish staff was thrilled by the engaging discussions and ideas presented by students throughout the Institute. We are confident that our Chapters are prepared for the coming year and we can’t wait to see where it will take us. Thank you to all involved in the conference — it was a huge success! We hope to see you there next year.

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